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Plugging a keyboard or drum pads into your Web browser is now a thing.

One month ago, we first saw hardware MIDI support in Chrome. That was a beta; this week, Google pushed it out to all Chrome users.

So, what can you actually do with this stuff? Well, you can open a Web tab and play a synth on actual hardware, which is pretty nifty.

Support is still a little dicey, but the available examples are growing fast. Here are some of the coolest, in addition to the MIDI example and demo code we saw last month.

The examples are certainly promising, but you may want to temper expectations. Users of browser-based solutions built on Flash will find some of this old news. Audiotool, for one, has already had a really sophisticated (semi-modular, even) production tool running for some years. (It’s relevant here that Audiotool is coming to the HTML5/MIDI support, but it isn’t here yet.) And while open standards are supposed to mean more compatibility, in practice, they are presently meaning far less. Even though Safari and Chrome are pretty close to one another in rendering pages, I couldn’t get any of these examples working properly in any browser other than Chrome. And while I could get pretty low-latency functionality, none of this is anywhere near as solid in terms of sound performance as any standalone music software.

So, that leaves two challenges. One, the implementation is going to have to improve if non-developers are going to start to use this. And two, if this stuff is going to see the light of day beyond music hackathons, it’ll need some applications. That said, I could imagine educational applications, demos of apps, collaborative possibilities, and more – and those expand if the tech improves. And, of course, this also gets really interesting on inexpensive Chromebooks – which it seems are selling in some numbers these days.

Check the entire tutorial here.

Source: create digital music 

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