Does technology define dance music? Kristan Caryl speaks to a range of producers to discover how much their tools dictate the way they make music and determine the end results.

“WE’VE TRACKED DOWN SEVEN PRODUCERS WHO ARE HAPPY TO ANALYSE AND TALK ABOUT THE IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGY ON THEIR MUSIC.”

A common refrain among dance music fans and producers goes something like this: “I don’t care about the tools; all that matters is what comes out of the speakers.” And for all its noble intentions, that sentiment is quite frankly a little weird, because in other art forms, from painting to film, the medium and tools are often discussed at length. It would be obtuse not to take an interest in the way that the Color Field artists of the mid-20th century used newly available acrylic paints, or the way Oliver Stone chooses to use different film formats in the same movie. Those technical decisions are integral to their respective artistic expressions.

We’ve tracked down seven producers who are happy to analyse and talk about the impact of technology on their music. We ask them how their tools limits or free them, how they impact on their creative process and whether they feel defined by the kit they use. We also ponder if new technology in dance music can, or will, ever incite shock and awe in the way that 303-driven acid house did in the late 80s. Most importantly of all, we try to find out to what extent these producers really feel they can speak through their chosen machines.

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SATOSHI TOMIIE

The dance music veteran who burst on to the scene with the Trax-released hit ‘Tears’ alongside the late, great Frankie Knuckles and is just about to release his latest artist album, New Day.

Yes, I think dance music is defined by technology and its limitations. Especially due to the fact that we all mostly use machines to make beats and melodies. Technology defines the end result and the limitations it presll post at:ents have made the process of making music very interesting. Even drum machines were made to ‘replace’ real drum sets and drummers in the beginning, but it’s nothing like real drums back in the day. This limitation has shaped the current electronic music landscape.

Full post at: Attack Magazine

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